Five Women Who Should Be Household Names In Canada

2018-10-18T14:29:31+00:00October 18, 2017|Women in media|

This post has been lightly edited; it was originally published on Canadian Museum for Human Rights' blog. A photo from the REDress Project Last year (2016) marked a century since some women in Canada first got the right to vote. The Canadian Museum for Human Rights shares the stories of many women in Canada who have fought for human rights. Some of them are very well-known, like Buffy Sainte Marie and Malala Yousafzai (an honourary Canadian citizen), while others aren’t as famous but really should be. This post, being republished today on Persons' Day during Women's History Month, is all about these lesser-known women – women who should be household names in Canada.

Why I’ve Spent my Life Dedicated to Women and Girls – and Why You Should do the Same

2018-01-31T17:03:15+00:00October 11, 2017|Empowering girls|

I was 11 years old when I lost my self-esteem.

I had just moved to Canada from Jamaica. Struggling with culture shock and a new school – not to mention the uncertainty of pre-teen girlhood – I desperately needed a mentor, a strong role model who believed in me. Instead, my teacher at the time decided that I was neither bright, nor capable. 

The damage to my self-esteem from that judgment has taken a lifetime to overcome – to remember who I am, and what I can do.

Yet I’m thankful for that experience because it ignited a life-long passion for social justice and advocating for the rights of women and girls.

When Have You Defied A Stereotype?

2018-01-31T17:03:15+00:00October 3, 2017|Empowering girls, SHE Magazine|

This story was originally published in the Fall 2014 issue of SHE Magazine.

Noushy Tavassoli

I am an architect and defied the stereotype that an immigrant woman can’t be successful in this male dominated world. It was hard to gain credibility and respect. I only would get jobs that used half my skills, so I worked to get accreditations that only a few people have in Canada. Today I work with the same men that openly said I wouldn’t make it. But I did—because I always believed in myself!

Rebecca Hare

People assume I am a ‘girly girl’ because I usually wear dresses or skirts to the office. In reality, I play soccer, run half-marathons, and watch way too much sports on TV. The highlight of my year is my annual March Madness trip. I wear skirts because I HATE shopping and can never find pants that fit. I always enjoy that moment when people finally get to know me and say “Oh, wow, you’re not at all who I thought you would be.” Exactly.